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new spoonflower fabric // hexagon tinies

Hexagon Tinies // Spoonflower Fabric Collection

The more that my 10-year-old sister gets into crafting, the more she takes notice of the things that I work on. The other day she discovered that making things is actually my job (as in, I get paid to do this!). Then yesterday she looked at the new fabric I just ordered.

My sister: Why does this fabric have faces on it?
Me: Because I designed it.
My sister: How did you do that?

The discussion faded away, but I just know that she is now thinking about what this means for her. I’m fully expecting special fabric requests soon.

All of this to say, I designed some new Spoonflower fabric, and it’s officially available for anyone to purchase. Hooray!

Hexagon Tinies // Spoonflower Fabric Collection
Hexagon Tinies // Spoonflower Fabric Collection

The collection came about because I was thinking about how great it would be to have some super cute kawaii low-volume fabric. I never seem to choose low-volume when stash-building, and when I do, it’s usually pretty basic.

Then it occurred to me that I could design my own! So I started with the Hexagon Tinies that I designed in June. And since I entirely agree with Stacey’s Cute Tip that making things rainbow is cute, I chose a rainbow palette.

And there’s some gray in there too for a nice neutral low-volume. The houses are my favorite!

Hexagon Tinies // Spoonflower Fabric Collection
Hexagon Tinies // Spoonflower Fabric Collection

I scaled all of the prints so they could be fussy cut to fit on 1-inch hexagons…some will fit smaller hexies! And if you’re going to use prints like these to make EPP hexagons, why not have some of the designs actually be EPP hexagons?

Again, these are each in a single color, but with a rainbow of color choices.

Hexagon Tinies // Spoonflower Fabric Collection
Hexagon Tinies // Spoonflower Fabric Collection

And while we’re talking rainbows, I HAD to make the rainbow into a mini collection of its own. The full color version reminds me of fabrics from my childhood.

Is it strange to have single-color rainbows? Maybe. But even if it’s in all blue or yellow or gray, it still looks like a rainbow, and that seemed like it could be useful to me. Actually, on all of the gray prints, I think you could stitch over the lines like a pre-printed pattern.

The samples that I had printed are on Kona cotton, so for the most part, Kona's basic white is the color you have for the fabric…just with a bit of color for the designs. I’m pretty smitten with these swatches!

Hexagon Tinies // Spoonflower Fabric Collection

Now, here’s where I need your help!

If you were to order these fabrics, would you be most likely to…

A) Order fat quarters or yardage of individual prints as needed? (You can already do this!)
B) Order a yard that has a small sample of every print?
C) Order a fat quarter or yardage that has a sample of a particular print (i.e. hexagons)?
D) Order a fat quarter or yardage of a particular color (i.e all the reds)?

I’d love to make it easier for folks to buy more than one design. Buying a yard at $19.00 (and getting several designs), rather than than buying separate fat quarters, is more cost effective for you. But to make special panels available, I need to order them first and I want to have options that you want!


Notes on color: I tried to have these photos come as close to the fabric as possible, but all computer monitors are different. Also, take notice that in the rainbow collection, other than the red, the colors are deeper than the other fabrics while still coordinating.

cute tips from stacey from freshstitches


Welcome to the second installment in the Cute Tips series! Today we get a very colorful tip from a maker who is completely adorable.

Stacey from FreshStitches describes her site as "cute. crafty. fun." and that couldn't be more accurate. She designs the super sweet amigurumi crochet patterns, and on her blog she shares some really great helps for learning crochet and adding new techniques.



Her tip is simple and so much fun to use in crochet or just about anything: Make it rainbow!

Here are a few of her most rainbow creations!




Does this remind you of the rainbows we loved from Lisa Frank while we were growing up? I bet you can put this cute tip to use right away. Thanks, Stacey!

A note to all my bloggy friends: Cute Tips contributors are generously sharing their cutest secrets with us. Be inspired by them, but please, please, please don't try to steal their style! Be your own cute self!

stitch love // six months and a stitchalong

Stitch Love Walk-Through

Today marks six months since my book Stitch Love: Sweet Creatures Big & Small came out. Six months! I can hardly believe it.

Big thanks to everyone who has already purchased a copy! If you have a moment, I'd love it if you leave a review on Amazon (especially), Barnes & Noble, or elsewhere.

If you don't have a copy yet, you may want one soon, because next week I'll be sharing the details for a stitch-along to go with Stitch Love! A Stitch-Love-Along, perhaps? We'll have three rounds, with each one focusing on a specific type of project, and special gifts for participating. I'm so excited!

@molliejohanson look what they have at Mitsuwa! #stitchlove #mitsuwa

A photo posted by Rebecca (@hugsarefun) on



The first day Stitch Love came out I ran over to my local Barnes & Noble and found a copy to take crazy pictures with. Since then, I check my local JoAnn every time I go, and have still never found it (although yesterday someone spotted it at their JoAnn!). But my favorite "in the wild" Stitch Love moment was when my friend Becca found it at the Japanese book store near us.

Japanese craft books were a huge inspiration for me as I was working on Stitch Love, so having my book on the shelves at the store where I go to grow my collection? Well, that was the best compliment I could receive!

I've been loving (stitch loving?) this journey so much, and I can't wait to see what will come next!

project // embroidered felt stargazing zip pouch

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch


Do zippers intimidate you when sewing? I've sewn them with success, but I still get nervous. This is a zip pouch that is completely the opposite of scary. The zipper is stitched in by hand, so it's practically an extension of the embroidery on the front!

I saw a pouch similar to this once, but it required buying die-cutting templates to cut the pouch. This is something you can embroider with a starscape or your own favorite design...then cut it out and stitch it up. Easy peasy!

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

You will need:

Wool or wool blend felt
Embroidery floss
Sulky Sticky Fabri-Solvy or tissue paper
Cotton fabric
Fusible interfacing
6-inch zipper

Stargazing Zip Pouch PDF Template

Note: Be sure to print the pattern at 100% so that the zipper will fit the opening. Measure the 1-inch test square to check for accuracy.

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch
DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

Print or trace the starry embroidery design onto Fabri-Solvy or tissue paper, then attach it to the felt so you can stitch through it. Embroider the stars and constellation with three strands of embroidery floss. I used french knots, straight stitches, running stitch, and the star stitch featured in this tutorial from Hands Occupied.

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

Soak away the Fabri-Solvy or tear away the tissue paper. If you're soaking it, remember that wool and wool blend felt will shrink in hot water. I used barely warm water and mine still shrunk just a bit. Blasting it with cool water was a better option.

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

Iron the fusible interfacing to the cotton fabric that will be your lining. Then iron it to the back of your embroidered felt. I like using paper-backed fusible interfacing, so that's what you see here. If yours doesn't have a paper back, you'll iron it to both pieces in one step.

Adding the "lining" will cover and protect the back of your stitching, which will keep it pretty longer.

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

Cut out the paper pattern, pin it to the embroidered felt, then cut out the shape.

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

Pin the zipper into the cut out opening.

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

Stitch around the zipper with running stitch. Take care to get a stitch or two into each side of the ends.

If hand sewing isn't your thing, you can do this part with a sewing machine. If you use matching thread for sewing, you can go back and add some hand stitched details just for cuteness' sake.

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

Trim the zipper ends so they are at least 1/4 inch in from the edges.

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

Fold the pouch in half and pin or clip the edges so they are aligned.

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

Stitch around the edge with running stitch. Again, you can do this on a sewing machine if you'd prefer.

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

Check that everything is secure and that your knots are hidden between the layers, and your pouch is finished!

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

The pouch is large enough to hold pens and a small note pad...

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch
DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch
DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

...or even some stitching supplies!

DIY Stargazing Zip Pouch

Of course, necessities like a phone, keys, and cash are always good for a little pouch.

Stitch one or stitch a bunch...use the star patterns or your favorite embroidery motif. You could make yours plain or add some felt applique. You could even reverse the pouch so that the felt is on the inside and the fabric is on the outside. So many ways to customize!

What will you keep in your pouch?

project // embroidered planner clips

Stitched Planner Clips


I love planners and paper and stationery of all kinds. However, I buy them and never use them. Okay, so I use them a bit, but never like I should or want to. Certainly not like the people who are making their planners cute. Seriously, do a search for "make your planner cute" and you'll see what I mean.

When it comes to planners, I do some of my planning on Google Calendar, I check in on the family calendar my mom keeps, and the rest of the time I fly by the seat of my pants. Most of the time this works for me. It's just not too cute. (Why can't you add emoji to Google Calendar?!?!)

For now, I'm going to add some little clips to my notebook, and be happy with making that a little cuter. You can make some of these embroidered clips too...they're fast, and you can stitch any tiny design you like!

Stitched Planner Clips

You will need:

Wool blend felt
Embroidery floss
Sulky Sticky Fabri-Solvy or tissue paper
Large paper clip
Fabric glue

Stitched Planner Clips

Trace or print your chosen embroidery pattern onto Fabri-Solvy or tissue paper, then stitch through the material and felt.

The little kitty I'm using is part of a larger pattern from Amy Sinibali's book Sweetly Stitched Handmades. Any small pattern will do!

Stitched Planner Clips

Cut around the embroidery, leaving some room so you don't get too close to those stitches. If you used Fabri-Solvy, soak it away, and if you used tissue paper tear away the tissue.

Cut a second piece of felt to match the shape of the embroidered piece. Keep track of which side needs to be up to match up with the front piece.

Stitched Planner Clips

Apply a layer of fabric glue over the plain piece of felt, then lay the non-clipping side of the jumbo paper clip in the glue.

Stitched Planner Clips

Smooth the embroidered piece onto the glue and allow it to fully dry.

Stitched Planner Clips

Now your clip is ready to add onto your planner, your journal, your sketchbook, etc. (I am entirely smitten with this kitten and its eyes in two sizes!)

Stitched Planner Clips
Stitched Planner Clips

Your clip will mark your spot and hold groups of pages together! Or you know...you could use it like you would a normal paper clip!

Stitched Planner Clips
Stitched Planner Clips

I recently came across this fishy clip that seems really familiar to me. Like, maybe it was mine when I was a kid? It's not unusual for bits and bobs like this to magically appear at just the right time.

Fishy does look incredibly happy for an animal that is so close to another animal that might eat him. I'm guessing that they've become friends and all will be well. I hope.

Stitched Planner Clips

I see many more stitched clips in my future. They are quick to stitch and put together, and they're such a fun extra to send to a friend!

thread bits // embroidery floss grain

Thread Bits // Floss Grain

I've been doing embroidery on and off since I was a little girl, and seriously for nearly ten years. And yet, it wasn't all that long ago that I learned something mind blowing. Now it's time to pass it on to you.

There is a right and wrong end to your embroidery floss.

Thread Bits // Floss Grain

Embroidery floss has a "grain" to it. And for a smoother, happier embroidery experience, you should go with the grain. Threading the floss through your needle the wrong way will pull your thread against the grain, which will make the floss get roughed up. Stitching with the grain keeps it smooth.

So how can you tell and make sure that you are starting with the right end?

Well, usually the end that is sticking out of a skein of DMC floss will be the right end to thread. That's not always the case with all embroidery floss. To check, run the floss through your fingers, there's a subtle difference, but going with the grain will feel smoother. You'll want to pull the floss through the fabric with the grain, so thread your needle accordingly.

I find that it's easiest to tell on a cut that is all six strands. After I separate the strands (when I'm doing so), I try to keep track of the "right end".

Do you stitch with the grain? Were you in the dark on this fact for as long as I was?

lovely stars on pinterest

Mario Kart Rainbow Road Coffee Cuff

Happy Saturday!

I've been collecting some fun projects to make that all involve stars, and they're all on my Lovely Stars board on Pinterest. I've shared a few star things that I've made, and I keep finding more from other folks too. There are projects and patterns that use different techniques, and there are stars with a variety of points.

Have you seen any good star projects around?

project // wish on a star leather bracelet

Wish On A Star Leather Bracelet


I think that wishing bracelets are so simple and pretty. They are usually a thin cord, often with a little charm, and they are made to be worn all the time. The idea is to make a wish when you tie it on, and when it wears off, the wish will come true.

While I don't really believe in the idea of a bracelet making your wish come true, I do like the way they look when they are still on a wrist. So I took inspiration from that for my "Wish on a Star" bracelet. You can make a wish if you want, or you can just enjoy a pretty metallic star!

Wish On A Star Leather Bracelet

You will need:

Metallic leather
Perle cotton thread
A pen
Sharp scissors
1/8" Hole punch (that will punch leather)

A few notes:

-I found my leather as a small piece near purse hardware at JoAnn. One piece will make lots of bracelets...oh, and use a coupon!

-You don't need to use leather for this project. Vinyl or faux leather will work, as will felt (it just won't last as long).

-Fiskars hole punches will punch leather. What a happy surprise! A Crop-a-Dile is also great for this.

Wish On A Star Leather Bracelet

Trace a star onto the back of the leather. A template is included below (print at 100%), but you can make the star any size you want.


Wish On A Star Leather Bracelet

Cut out the star with scissors. As long as your scissors are pretty sharp, this should be pretty easy.

Wish On A Star Leather Bracelet
Wish On A Star Leather Bracelet

Punch two holes in the sides of the star. Be careful to not get too close to the edges!

Wish On A Star Leather Bracelet

If you want your bracelet to fall off sooner, use only one or two strands of perle cotton. If you want it to last longer, go with three or four.

I cut a piece that is about 4 feet long, then I doubled it and doubled it again, keeping the loops at each end.

Wish On A Star Leather Bracelet

Thread the perle cotton through the holes in the star.

Wish On A Star Leather Bracelet

Tie the bracelet on your wrist, or on your friend's wrist! I went with a bow on this one so that I could remove it. However, a knot will work too. If you're knotting it, trim away the ends.

Wish On A Star Leather Bracelet

Now your wrist has a bit of sparkle!

Wish On A Star Leather Bracelet

Of course, a star isn't the only shape for a bracelet like this. A circle would look like a shiny gold button, and you know me and my hexagons! You can see in my hexagon bracelet how I used fewer strands, and I threaded the perle cotton through a little differently.

Wish On A Star Leather Bracelet

Give some stars as gifts, or make one for yourself. They're just fun to wear! And if I could make one wish for you today, it would be that you shine!